Category Archives: rebt-cbt-post

Multi-Tasking Versus Being Mindful

by Deniz Sidali, M.A.

In today’s society and especially in big cities such as New York, multi-tasking is heavily emphasized and appears to be a prerequisite for city dwellers. Even in job postings, the potential employers may indicate, “Must be good at multi-tasking”. But, what does multi-tasking actually entail? Well, for starters it involves being able to perform multiple, simple skill level tasks simultaneously in order to consolidate one’s time and efforts in completing these activities.… Read more...

Posted in rebt-cbt-post

We Are All Both Unique and Alike

by William Taboas, M.A.

We are all both unique and alike at the same time. Even for those of us at the ends of the bell-shaped normal curve, we still encompass humanity and its variety. However, it is easy for us to engage in  harsh self-evaluation when we tend to forget that we are not alone in our struggles. As social animals, we have the tendency to make distorted comparisons to other people, often concluding that whatever struggle we currently have is a defect of essence or character deficit.  … Read more...
Posted in rebt-cbt-post

On Recovering from Cookie Disappointment

by Megan Sy, M.A., M.S. 

One of the great disappointments in my life is biting into a raisin cookie thinking it is chocolate chip. Now I’m sure that there are deeper and more meaningful examples of disappointment, but the core experience is relatively similar. By nature, we all tend to approach situations with some sort of expectation regarding what will happen. Many times, that expectation is a positive one. And many times, unfortunately, we are let down.… Read more...

Posted in rebt-cbt-post

Tired is Not an Excuse!

by Mark Schiffman, M.S. 

I was once on a research fellowship where the expectation from the teacher/adviser was that we would all come on time and put in the daily, full day of research.  One day, one of the other fellows did not come on time and the teacher asked, “Where’s John?”  One of his friends relayed a message from John that he was very tired and was going to be in a little later.  The teacher did not take kindly to this and yelled back, “Tired is not an excuse!”

In RE&CBT we talk a lot about thoughts that run through our heads and how they affect our behaviors and emotions. … Read more...

Posted in rebt-cbt-post

Tough but Tolerable Transitions

by Brianna Cheney, M.A. 

As the academic year comes to a close, May and June are often coupled with change for students – whether it be the transition from one school to another or from academic life to a job (or job searching!).  As a doctoral student who will soon be transitioning to my internship year, I have been thinking quite a bit about managing the emotions that come with transition.  Based on informal discussion with fellow doctoral students, I have come to the conclusion that while transitions continue to be inherently stressful, we tend to get better at managing transition as we become more experienced with them.… Read more...

Posted in rebt-cbt-post

Global Evaluations of Others & Fundamental Attribution Error

by William Taboas, M.A.

One of the core irrational beliefs that Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy addresses is other-downing, an externalizing variant of self-downing or self-condemnation. Albert Ellis defined other-downing as a form of global evaluation of human worth: we condemn others for not meeting our demands or expectations. Global negative evaluations and beliefs  of others are often associated with the emotions of hurt, anger, envy, and jealousy. When someone has trespassed us, we pass global judgment on them, their character, and their worth as a human.Read more...

Posted in rebt-cbt-post

Forgiving Without Forgetting

by Megan Sy, M.A., M.S. 

In a recent This American Life broadcast, they featured several individuals with hyperthymesia or HSAM (highly superior autobiographical memory). People with HSAM have such strong memory abilities that they can remember minute details of their lives for decades. One man could remember the day of the week, the weather conditions, what he ate, and what was on TV for any given date for the last 20 years. Amazing! Well, it turns out that the downside of having excellent memory is that these individuals have difficulty moving on when something goes wrong or when someone hurts them.… Read more...

Posted in rebt-cbt-post

You Will Fail!

by  Mark Schiffman, M.S. 

I once had a professor in college who repeatedly reminded us from day one and continually throughout the semester, in his memorable threatening voice, that if we didn’t remember x, y, or z fact, “YOU WILL FAIL!”  I just heard about a first grade student who came home worrying to her parents that despite her good grades she will have to repeat first grade because her teacher keeps telling all of the students that if they do badly they will have to repeat the grade.… Read more...

Posted in rebt-cbt-post

Tolerating Tense Travel

by Brianna Cheney, M.A.

As fun and exciting as trips can be, traveling often comprises some level of stress.  Anyone who has missed or come close to missing a train or plane knows that this can lead to a surge of adrenaline and a tense environment.  Although it can be easy to blame our travel partners for creating this stress (“I told you that we should have left earlier!”), our thoughts about travel mishaps –rather than our travel partners- are the mechanisms creating and maintaining our emotional distress!… Read more...

Posted in rebt-cbt-post

Keep our city clean PLEASE!

by Elissa Habinsky, M.A., M.S. 

New Yorkers walk no matter what the weather is.  We walk in the rain, the snow and the sleet. However, as the weather gets warmer, as it is doing so now, we stroll. Strolling rather than walking allows one to notice things that we may miss when walking since when we walk, we tend to do so quickly, and often are glancing at our phones or listening to music. Moreover, as I was strolling down the street the other day, I noticed several things that triggered me to become angry.… Read more...

Posted in rebt-cbt-post