Category Archives: rebt-cbt-post

Parental Views of Failure: An Article Review

by William Taboas, M.A. 

Hot off the press, and just following recent Father’s Day celebrations – I just finished reading a peer-reviewed article published in the Psychological Science journal June 2016 issue, titled “What Predicts Children’s Fixed and Growth Intelligence Mind-Sets? Not Their Parent’s Views of Intelligence but Their Parent’s Views of Failure”. The title immediately caught my eye; here at the Albert Ellis Institute, we have published many blogs, sold books, and conducted studies examining our irrational beliefs around failure, perfectionism, motivation, and goal-oriented behavior.… Read more...

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“I Think, Therefore I Am”

by Deniz Sidali, M.A. 

The French philosopher, Rene Descartes is famous for the proposition, “Je pense, donc je suis”. In Latin, it is translated as “Cogito ergo sum”. And in English, we know this popular phrase as “I think, therefore I am”.  This statement serves as the foundation for knowledge in the face of radical doubt. It implies that while other knowledge could be a figment of imagination, deception, or mistake, the very act of doubting one’s own existence served as proof of the reality of one’s own mind; there must be a thinking entity (or self) for there to be thought.… Read more...

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Endings Might Not Be So Bad

by Megan Sy, M.A., M.S. 

Endings are tough for many people. It usually doesn’t matter what kind of ending it is – all endings big and small often have that sense of “bittersweetness” to them.

I recently left a part-time position at my university. On my last day there, I found myself thinking, “I can’t believe it’s ending!” and getting quite sad and anxious. It struck me soon after how silly of a thought that was.… Read more...

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I Don’t Care

by Mark Schiffman, M.S. 

John’s wife just left him, his kids hate him, and he just lost his job.  Understandably, he is very distressed and reports feeling both angry and depressed.  “So, John, what specifically can I help you with?” his therapist asks. “What would you like to feel instead of angry and depressed?”   “I really want to just not care anymore” John responds. “I wish I just had thicker skin so that these things would stop bothering me already so I can finally be happy!”

According to the Practitioner’s Guide to REBT, one of the starting points to good therapy is identifying and agreeing upon treatment goals (p.79). … Read more...

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Goaded by Guilt

by Brianna Cheney, M.A. 

Lately, many of my young adult friends have discussed struggling with guilt around family obligations.  As their parents age and develop health-related issues, they are faced with the novel challenge of balancing their own lives and fulfilling the needs of their parents.  This can be particularly challenging for people who live long distances away from their family, as the logistical and financial toll of traveling to their parents is even more significant.… Read more...

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Summer: A Season of Change

by Elissa Habinsky, M.A, M.S. 

Summer is a transient time. The weather changes, and for many people so do their schedules (summer fridays), work attire, recreational activities (vacations, outdoor sports etc.) among other things. While many of these changes may be seen as positives, even positive change can activate feelings of anxiety. Why is this so? This type of anxiety can often be explained by the fact that change, small or large, is regularly associated with a particular level of uncertainty.… Read more...

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When Love Becomes Obsession

by Deniz Sidali, M.A.

While I was working at a clinic specializing in Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, a few of my colleagues remarked about how many of their clients would obsess and ruminate about their former significant others even years after the dissolution of their relationship.  It was observed that not only would these clients spend excessive time thinking about their former love interests but they would do so with much passion expressing remorse, contempt, bitterness, hatred, despondency, and sorrow. … Read more...

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If I’m not going to be a winner, I’d rather not play at all.

by William Taboas, M.A.

There is a prevailing philosophy of life in westernized and post-industrial cultures that to  “win” is to strive in life. Winning can mean a number of things; from winning a competition to getting a job, to getting enough money to buy what you want. But framing a life around winning implicitly frames life also around losing. You end up with a false dichotomy: I am either a winner or a loser.

There are several problems with this type of “black and white” thinking. … Read more...

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Yearly Inspection

by Mark Schiffman, M.S. 

I just took my car in for its yearly vehicle inspection, which inspired a thought.  When it comes to our cars, the government mandates that we check them to make sure they are running safely and relatively smoothly regardless of whether or not they are demonstrating any problems.  When it comes to our teeth, we generally have the habit of a yearly or twice yearly check-up, even if we have no tooth pain. … Read more...

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Rational Emotive Sleep Hygiene

by Brianna Cheney, M.A.

Many sleep hygiene guidelines advise readers to cover up their clocks at bedtime and to refrain from counting the hours of sleep they are about to get.  Although these guidelines seldom provide the rationale for how these practices might help, my conjecture would be that seeing the time and calculating your hours of sleep may trigger anxiety-producing thoughts that are counter-productive to falling asleep.  Many of us can relate to the experience of glancing at the clock and thinking that it’s already ___ a.m.Read more...

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