Category Archives: rebt-cbt-post

REBT in the ER

by Raymond Moody, M.A. 

I was really looking forward to starting my externship at The Albert Ellis Institute (AEI) this week. I had completed several days of training, attended orientation, and purchased the necessary supplies. My plan was to get a good night of sleep, go to the gym in the morning, and get to AEI early so I could be cool and collected before my first client. But, life happens.

Sunday night as I was headed to bed, my partner started complaining about the stomach pain he was having.… Read more...

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Feeling Angry in Traffic

by Amanda Rosinski, M.A. 

As I planned my return trip from vacation this week, the dreaded thought of potential traffic delays was at the forefront of my mind. Sitting in bumper-to-bumper traffic has historically challenged my patience. And New York City is very well-known for its frequent traffic delays, making the thought of experiencing traffic delays seem inevitable for me. What if what is supposed to be a four hour drive turns into a six hour drive?… Read more...

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Doctor’s Office Waiting Woes

by Stephanie Schwartz, M.S.

A visit to the doctor is not a particularly enjoyable experience. As a kid, I remember going to two doctors appointment each year – the pediatrician and the dentist. Now as a young adult, the number of doctors has grown. The optometrist, the podiatrist, the physiatrist, the list goes on (and I’m sure will continue to grow as I age). What’s notable is that what I dread most about going to the doctor isn’t the actual appointment, it’s the wait time to be seen by the doctor!… Read more...

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“Gotta Catch em All!”

by Mark Schiffman, M.S. 

The Pokémon Go craze has made for some interesting stories. CNN collected some of the most extreme, including the story about Tom Currie from New Zealand who quit his job in order to travel the world to try and catch all 250 Pokémon.  Two men in San Diego fell off a cliff and suffered unknown injuries in pursuit of one particularly evasive one.  The Holocaust Museum and Arlington National Cemetery had to ask visitors not to act irreverently by trying to catch Pokémon in their somber spaces.… Read more...

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Gratitude

by Elissa Habinsky, M.A., M.S.

For almost two weeks, I have been practicing a gratitude exercise. Each day, at around the same time, I write down one thing for which I am grateful. The thing may be large or small, the size does not matter. What does matter, however, is that I take note of it. As such, I have noticed that I am grateful for many things including, family, friends, health, and simple pleasures such as fresh fruit, nice weather and lazy weekend days.… Read more...

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Train Delays

by Mark Schiffman, M.S. 

I am the type of person who on the one hand values being on time, but on the other, pushes a lot into my schedule to the point where I am usually rushing from one thing to another to ensure that I am on time.  While I am usually not late to too many things that I have to be on time for, I am usually not early either.  This is what made what happened last week so ironic.… Read more...

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I Moved…AGAIN

by Elissa Habinsky, M.A., M.S. 

I moved…again. Just a few weeks ago, I moved for the second time in less than one year. It was not a move that I anticipated making, but rather one that was due to extenuating circumstances. In any event, moving for many people is often an overwhelming and stressful endeavor. However, being able to learn from the mistakes I made with my first move, resulted in a much more successful and less anxiety-provoking second move.… Read more...

Posted in rebt-cbt-post

I Moved…AGAIN

by Elissa Habinsky, M.A., M.S. 

I moved…again. Just a few weeks ago, I moved for the second time in less than one year. It was not a move that I anticipated making, but rather one that was due to extenuating circumstances. In any event, moving for many people is often an overwhelming and stressful endeavor. However, being able to learn from the mistakes I made with my first move, resulted in a much more successful and less anxiety-provoking second move.… Read more...

Posted in rebt-cbt-post

Parental Views of Failure: An Article Review

by William Taboas, M.A. 

Hot off the press, and just following recent Father’s Day celebrations – I just finished reading a peer-reviewed article published in the Psychological Science journal June 2016 issue, titled “What Predicts Children’s Fixed and Growth Intelligence Mind-Sets? Not Their Parent’s Views of Intelligence but Their Parent’s Views of Failure”. The title immediately caught my eye; here at the Albert Ellis Institute, we have published many blogs, sold books, and conducted studies examining our irrational beliefs around failure, perfectionism, motivation, and goal-oriented behavior.… Read more...

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“I Think, Therefore I Am”

by Deniz Sidali, M.A. 

The French philosopher, Rene Descartes is famous for the proposition, “Je pense, donc je suis”. In Latin, it is translated as “Cogito ergo sum”. And in English, we know this popular phrase as “I think, therefore I am”.  This statement serves as the foundation for knowledge in the face of radical doubt. It implies that while other knowledge could be a figment of imagination, deception, or mistake, the very act of doubting one’s own existence served as proof of the reality of one’s own mind; there must be a thinking entity (or self) for there to be thought.… Read more...

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