Category Archives: rebt-cbt-post

Turn On, No Shut Off, The News

by Tom Kelly, M.S.

No matter your political allegiances, there is no denying that these are contentious times in contemporary politics. As a result, it seems that all sources of news have become filled with arguments, complaints, and even attacks. In addition, what is considered a source of news has greatly changed, as information has begun to spill over into social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter. There is no escaping the hotly contested debates!

The question of who is right and who is wrong within the news cycle is one question.… Read more...

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Bachelor Breakdown

by Stephanie Grossman, M.A.

Finally, after a 4-month hiatus, my (not so) guilty pleasure, The Bachelor, is back on the air! In a heavily produced environment, where female contestants are stripped of all electronic devices and reading materials, forced to think only of a sole love interest they don’t actually know, yet they are all competing for, unhealthy negative emotions run high. As the viewer, this provides the perfect type of dramatic entertainment, but for the contestants, distress is common.… Read more...

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The Cheerleader and The Critic

by Kimberly Alexander, M.S.

You know the tricky thing about thoughts that run through our mind is that even when you learn how to challenge and change unhelpful/maladaptive/negativistic ways of thinking in one situation, you sometimes fall into the same trap of unhelpful thinking when a new scenario comes up…

Well around this time of year is when applications for next year’s internships start going out. And as similar to last year, I find myself in a pit of self-doubt when I examine the requirements and expectations for each internship posting.… Read more...

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I’m So Cold

by Josh Dredze, Psy.D

As I waited at 9 a.m. at a bus stop in the freezing temperature of this excessively cold winter, all I could think was “I’m so cold.” I didn’t check my phone, as I knew taking off my gloves to reach into my pocket would only further expose me to the elements, but I realized the bus I had been waiting for was well past its scheduled arrival time. In general, I’m not a morning person, but these circumstances made things that much worse.… Read more...

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New Year’s Resolution: Stop Lying to Myself

by Thomas Whitfield, M.A.

A recent survey reported that between 40-50% of Americans make New Year’s resolutions. Unsurprisingly the top choice is to be healthier/lose weight, followed by an improvement in finances, and then having a better relationship/sex life. After much thought, I’ve decided that mine is to stop lying to myself.

There is one specific itty bitty little lie that I tell myself every day. It seems both harmless and potentially true, but I do rely on it more than I would like to.… Read more...

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Letting Go Of Perfectionistic Demands

by Glynnis McDonnell, M.A.

I am a person who likes to do things well.  I generally strive to do all tasks on time and do them to the very best of my ability.  As my time commitments and responsibilities mount throughout graduate school, I am trying to embrace the ideas that it is okay to ask for the occasional extension (as long as I don’t make a habit of it), that there are some tasks that simply require “good enough” work instead of excellent work, and that it is okay to say no to some requests. … Read more...

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Respect Me, I’m Your Professor!

by Stephanie Grossman, M.A.

Over the past few years of teaching undergraduate courses, I have learned one thing: teaching is very hard. I have found that preparing for lectures, trying to find innovative ways to make class engaging, writing exams, and grading papers is time consuming and exhausting, especially so when teaching an unfamiliar course (sometimes half the battle is teaching myself the material first!). Despite these challenges, however, I am able to cope with them and think rationally, understanding that while I’d prefer not to teach multiple courses that take time away from my research and clinical work, I do enjoy getting paychecks, and it can be rewarding to see students start to grasp and appreciate new material.… Read more...

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Watching My Language

by Tom Kelly, M.S.

There are certain words in our vocabulary that we simply do not use in certain settings. We know there are four letter words that would not function well at work or other formal situations. Aside from the occasional slip up, most of us are very good at watching our language. I would like to propose adding a new word to watch out for: Deserve.

The word deserve can get us into a lot of trouble.… Read more...

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Sometimes You Just Need to Let It Out

by Kimberly Alexander, M.S.

So, I have a pet peeve since I’ve been in this field training to be a psychologist. It irritates me when I speak to friends about stressful experiences and they say something like “Well you’re “doing psychology”, you shouldn’t get that upset at the situation, you know better!” Essentially, there are these very faulty assumptions that I have come across on repeated occasions that make me think I am not entitled to the same emotional experiences as others not “doing psychology.” And how do I respond during these moments?… Read more...

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The Healthy Emotions of Public Transit

by Josh Dredze, Psy.D.

We all have pet peeves. For some, it’s dishes in the sink, while for others it may be loud chewing. For me, it’s not offering an older or disabled person your seat on public transit. I realize this is a little more than a ‘pet peeve,’ but for me, it has become a more common occurrence of late.

I was recently heading uptown on the subway late one night from work and faced my pet peeve.… Read more...

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