Category Archives: rebt-cbt-post

September is Coming

by Rosina Pzena, M.S. 

With just a week left until September, I feel pulled in two different directions. On one side, I’m thinking I need to get myself together and be productive in my last week of relative freedom, and take care of things I won’t likely have time to do when I get back to the daily grind like cleaning out my closet. On the other side, I’m thinking I need to enjoy my last week of summer, take a few beach days, read a good book, and finish recharging before summer is completely over.… Read more...

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Learning from Lateness

by Carly Mayer, M.S. 

Last week, my friend was late to dinner. She is my friend that is perpetually late and every time we go out, I kick myself for being on time. I sat at the table thinking about how stupid I was for showing up on time, yet again, when I anticipated she would be late based on her past behavior.  I continuously told myself “I can’t stand it when she’s late, I’ve told her this a thousand times and she should be on time.” However, we had not seen each other in awhile and her showing up to an angry me was not going to make this an enjoyable meal.… Read more...

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The Reviews Are In

By Raymond L. Moody, M.A.

In graduate school there is pressure to obtain grant funding and publish research. Both of these require months to review the existing literature, collect data, analyze, and then write a compelling argument. Then, all of your work is submitted to anonymous reviewers for them to examine the strengths and weaknesses of your research. This rigorous review process is vital to ensuring that valuable resources are being used to fund important research and that the information generated from this research is of good quality and valid.… Read more...

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Adhering to Store Policies

By Johna Hansen, L.C.S.W.

The other day I ordered some items online to pick up in the store.  Upon arrival at the store I realized I needed my ID in order to pick up the items.  Fortunately, this time I had my ID with me.  However, the person behind me did not have his ID with him.  The store clerk explained that store policy requires one to have ID in order to pick up the items at the store. … Read more...

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Social Media Blues

by Rosina Pzena, M.S. 

It’s summer, and that means for many of us when we open up social media and check our Facebook and Instagram feeds, they are plastered with photos of our friends enjoying fun day-trips and vacations. One friend is having a relaxing beach day, one is partying in the Hamptons, and another is wine tasting in California. Looking through social media while I’m sitting on my couch or heading in to work can result in me feeling really depressed.… Read more...

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Beating the Heat

by Amanda Rosinski, M.A.

The past few weeks of NYC summer have been exceptionally hot and humid, even full of many excessive heat warnings. I walk outside and immediately want to turn around and go back into my air conditioned apartment. The heat is even more challenging for me when taking public transportation. The subway stations may reach temperatures even hotter than the outdoors! When I enter the subway stations, I immediately start sweating. How long will I have to wait for the next train??Read more...

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Double-Booked

by Stephanie Schwartz, M.S. 

The past week has been quite busy for me. First, I traveled to Denver to present at the American Psychological Association convention. While I would have enjoyed staying for the entirety of the conference and exploring the city of Denver, I was only there for 2 days as I had a wedding in New York to return for. I planned to be back from Denver for the Friday night wedding rehearsal dinner and I was expected to be present at 9AM on Saturday (the wedding day) to get ready with the bridal party and take pictures.… Read more...

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Lessons from the Olympics

by Mark Schiffman, M.S.

“Before a single event has begun, a single point awarded, a single shot contested, the competitors have already lived these Olympics. They’ve felt their hand raised, swelled with pride as the national anthem played, felt the medal hang and tug at their neck.” In a recent article in the Washington Post, sports writer Rick Maese describes how sports psychologists help Olympians train by having them mentally visualize the matches beforehand.  Richard Suinn has been working with downhill skiers for over 40 years and his research shows that just asking the athletes to visualize themselves skiing made their brains and bodies react in similar ways to when they were actually skiing.… Read more...

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Sports Superstitions

by Megan Sy, M.A., M.S. 

As the Summer Olympics kick off, I’ve been watching the previews and the games with particular fascination for any rituals or superstitions the athletes might have. Some of these happen away from the eye of the camera, like the athlete who wears lucky socks or puts their cleats on in a certain way. But some of it happens in plain sight – the swimmer who does eight arm swings, four goggle presses, and four cap touches, the tennis player who bounces the ball five times before the first serve, and so on.… Read more...

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Swimming Through the Streets

by Carly Mayer, M.S. 

This past weekend, I was looking forward to a short vacation with some friends on Fire Island. We had rented a house and planned this one weekend away last winter and I was very excited to get away. Then I saw the weather forecast. The weather report predicted rain and thunderstorms for the entire weekend. I questioned if it was even worth going and being stuck inside all weekend, but I decided to go regardless.… Read more...

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